Is Your Brand Sociable Enough?

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For your business brand to be truly social, it takes more than just having a website and asking people to “Like us on Facebook”. Those are social media tools. But what is your brand’s social message? Without a carefully crafted and focused social message, you’re wasting your time and money and it could be affecting your bottom line in a negative way.

In today’s marketplace, it is not enough just to offer a great selection at a good price. That is a basic requirement. Consumers today are making decision on what a brand says, what it does and what it stands for.  What does your brand say, do and stand for? It is important to figure that out and learn how to articulate it before you spend your hard-earned money on any form of advertising, including social media advertising.

In his book, Start with Why, author Simon Sinek says: “People don’t buy WHAT you do; they buy WHY you do it.” Most companies focus on advertising the WHAT of their business,their products, industry and competitors. They can even articulate the HOW they do WHAT they do. But it become more difficult to describe the WHY of a business, the purpose, cause or belief. The WHY of a business it their reason for being and the WHY is the why anyone should care.

Sixty two percent of consumers want companies to take a stand on current and broadly relevant issues such as fair employment practices,transparency and sustainable living. 1

This consumer desire can drive strong product growth. The parent company of Dove soap, Lipton Tea and Knorr Food Products, Unilever,found that their brands that focus on sustainable living in their advertising message grew 50% faster than their brands that don’t. The Unilever family of products with a sustainable living message in their advertising delivered 60%of the company’s revenue growth in 2016. 2, 3

How do you capitalize on a consumer’s desire to do business with a purpose driven brand? First, you need to be able to walk the talk. People can detect inconsistencies, and when they do, you are perceived as inauthentic and you erode trust.

At Knorr Food Products, they describe their WHY this way; “we have a responsibility to help make positive change across the food system from the way food is grown, to the way food is consumed. We believe nutritious and delicious food should be within everyone’s reach. That’s why our ambition is to source 100% of raw agricultural materials sustainably and to help more than 1 billion people improve their health and well-being by teaching them how to cook nutritiously by 2020.” 4

Dove, they don’t sell soap, they are working to make beauty a source of confidence, not anxiety. They don’t hire models for their advertising, they use real women of all ages to challenge stereotypes and highlight how beauty is unique to the individual. Dove portrays women, as they are in real life and they don’t digitally distort the images in their advertising.Since 2004 the Dove Self-Esteem Project has delivered self-esteem and body confidence education to over 20 million young people is 139 countries with a goal to reach another 20 million by 2020.5

Dove is the most popular bar of soap in the United States with more than twice the market share as the number two brand, Dial. 5

According to the Accenture report, beyond price and quality, these are the top consumer drivers: 1

  • 66% – The brand has a great culture, it does what it says it will do and delivers on its promises.
  • 66% – The company is transparent with where it sources materials and treats employees.
  • 62% – The brand believes in reducing plastics and improving the environment.
  • 62% – The brand has ethical values and demonstrates authenticity in everything it does.
  • 62% – The brand is passionate about the products and services it sells.

Here are four ways to make your brand more sociable:

  1. Get a copy of Start with Why from Simon Sinek and work to figure out your WHY.
  2. Develop a paragraph to describe your WHY.
  3. Align all your actions with your WHY.
  4. Eliminate clichés from your advertising message and replace them with a genuine message of WHAT you do for the consumer and WHY you do it.   

Then, you will be ready to buy some traditional and social media advertising.

Let me know if I can help.

  1. Accenture Strategy Global Consumer Pulse Research, 2018.
  2. Unilever,“How to boost business growth through brands with purpose,” August 8, 2017.
  3. “Empowering Unilever marketers and unstereotyping ads: Keith Weed’s case for Global Marketer of the Year,”Campaign, January 24, 2018.
  4. https://www.unilever.com/brands/food-and-drink/knorr.html
  5. https://www.unilever.com/brands/personal-care/dove.html
  6. https://www.statista.com/statistics/275244/us-households-most-used-brands-of-bar-soap/

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Spike SanteeIs Your Brand Sociable Enough?
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Not In “Like” with Facebook Any More

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A lot of users are no longer so in “Like” with Facebook. Some 42% of Americans 18+ say they have “taken a break” from checking the social media platform for several weeks or more, while 26% have deleted the Facebook app from their cellphone. And 54% have adjusted their privacy settings in the past 12 months, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. In all, 74% of Facebook users say they have taken at least one of these three actions in the past year.

The findings come from a survey of U.S. adults conducted May 29-June 11, following the news that the former consulting firm Cambridge Analytica had collected data on tens of millions of Facebook users without their knowledge.

This Pew data parallels the 2018 Infinite Dial survey, which found that Facebook usage has dropped for the first time in a decade. Usage reached 62% of persons 12+ in 2018, down from 67% in 2017, 64% in 2016, and 62% in 2015. Mind you, Facebook still remains dominant among social media platforms, used “most often” by 57% of those 12+, followed by Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Twitter.

Facebook has also faced scrutiny from conservative lawmakers and pundits over allegations that it suppresses conservative voices. The Center found that the vast majority of Republicans think that social platforms in general censor political speech they find objectionable. Despite these concerns, the poll found nearly identical shares of Democrats and Republicans use Facebook. Republicans are no more likely than Democrats to have taken a break from Facebook or deleted the app from their phone in the past year.

Pew did find age differences in the share of Facebook users who have recently taken some of these actions. Most notably, 44% of younger users (18 to 29) say they have deleted the Facebook app from their phone in the past year, nearly four times the share of users ages 65 and older (12%) who have done so. Similarly, older users are much less likely to say they have adjusted their Facebook privacy settings in the past 12 months: Only a third of Facebook users 65 and older have done this, compared with 64% of younger users.

In the wake of the revelations about Cambridge Analytica, Facebook updated its privacy settings to make it easier for users to download the data the site had collected about them, Pew explains. The new survey finds that around one-in-ten Facebook users (9%) have downloaded the personal data about them available on Facebook. But despite their relatively small size as a share of the Facebook population, these users are highly privacy-conscious. Roughly half who have downloaded their personal data from Facebook (47%) have deleted the app from their cellphone, while 79% have elected to adjust their privacy settings.

Facebook fatigue is a real problem for a local business trying to advertise their business on social media. There is so much misinformation on the Internet that people no longer trust much of what they see. Consequently, your advertising in social media is met with similar skepticism. People don’t know if they can trust what you are telling them. 

If you want to see real advertising results, you need to call your advertising salesperson at your local Radio station. There is no fake users listening to the Radio. All listener metrics are provided by a third party, the Nielsen Company. 

Radio listenership is an emotional connection with a person’s “favorite” Radio station. They trust that Radio station because the station plays the music the “love”. They trust the local DJ so they trust what hat DJ says. 

Advertising on local Radio wraps your message in a shield of trust, getting through to more people the way you want them to hear it. 

Radio is word of mouth advertising. But instead of one person to the next, your local Radio station can talk to tens of thousands of “ears” everytime your commercial comes over the Radio. 

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Spike SanteeNot In “Like” with Facebook Any More
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Facebook, Fake Accounts, Fake Numbers, Fake Results

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Here is another story that questions the veracity of social media advertising claims. Danielle Singer is a psychotherapist at Therapy Threads, a natural aromatherapy fashion and self-care products company in Kansas City. Singer has filed a lawsuit against Facebook accusing the company of bilking advertisers by inflating the number of people Facebook ads could reach.

Spike SanteeFacebook, Fake Accounts, Fake Numbers, Fake Results
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